Lacto-Fermented Shiitake Mushroom on a yellow plate with an orange floral scarf in the background

Pickled Shiitake Mushrooms

Lacto-fermenting mushrooms (pickling them with salt) is a delicious and resourceful way to extend their life, flavor, and bioavailability of nutrients. If you’re new to fermented foods, this is a great recipe to begin with, because the mushrooms don’t turn very sour like many other fermented foods do, and they don’t take nearly as long to pickle as, say, cucumbers. The benefits of eating fermented foods are numerous and well-documented, so I won’t go into too much detail here, but suffice it to say that if you’re a mushroom lover looking for ways to improve and/or support your gut health, you need look no further!

I used shiitake mushrooms because they’re one of my favorite varieties, and because they’re on the sturdier side. I also love the velvety texture that is unique to shiitake mushrooms, but this recipe can be used with any variety of mushroom you can think of. Some suitable options that automatically jump to mind are chanterelle, oyster, trumpet, cremini, or even simple button mushrooms. You can even make different variations and do a taste test!

This recipe calls for the mushrooms to be stored in a brine flavored with garlic, coriander seeds, mustard seeds, black peppercorns, and chopped dill. The classic pickling flavors permeate the absorbant mushrooms to create a boldness of flavor that is simply divine. That being said, the spices and herbs are another area for experimentation if you feel so inclined, as the delicious combination possibilities are endless! Please note that because the mushrooms absorb so much of the salt used for pickling, it’s best to soak them in fresh water for 1-3 minutes then pat them dry before serving to temper the saltiness.

All of the products that I used to create this recipe can be purchased using the links below:

Disclaimer: I receive a commission for the purchase of any product using the links provided on my website, with no additional cost to you.

Bring a small to medium saucepan filled with salted water to a boil. Add the mushrooms and boil for 5 minutes. Remove from the water and place onto a plate lined with paper towel or a kitchen towel.

In a small bowl, combine the peppercorns, coriander seeds, and mustard seeds. Set aside next to a sterilized jar.

Add a layer of kosher salt to the bottom of the jar, along with a pinch of the spice/seed mixture. Place a layer of mushrooms over the seasonings, then add a sprinkle of salt and another pinch of the mixture.

Repeat until all of the mushrooms are in the jar, topping them off with salt and the rest of the spices and seeds. Tuck the head of garlic into the jar among the mushrooms so that it’s nestled nicely about halfway down.

Sprinkle the chopped dill over the top and place the weight (or weights, depending on how much space you have left) into the jar and seal tightly. Place in a cool, dark place (like a pantry).

After 24 hours, the jar should be wet inside from the salt drawing moisture out of the mushrooms. If the jar isn’t filled with mushroom water, top it off with brine made by mixing 1 Tbsp kosher salt for every 1 cup of water. Reseal the jar and let it sit in a cool, dark place for another 3 days, “burping” it daily, or opening the jar to release built-up pressure.

Once the mushrooms have fermented, store the entire jar and its contents (including the brine) in the refrigerator. They will keep for several months.

Before serving, soak the mushrooms in fresh water for 1-3 minutes, depending on how salty you want them (the less time you soak them, the saltier the mushrooms will be). Serve cold or at room temperature as an appetizer, side, sandwich ingredient, or even as a snack!

Lacto-Fermented Mushroom on a small white and gold fork with a yellow plate, a jar full of mushrooms, and sprigs of dill in the background

Lacto-Fermented Shiitake Mushroom on a yellow plate with an orange floral scarf in the background

Pickled Shiitake Mushrooms

Becca Gallick-Mitchell
Lacto-fermenting mushrooms (pickling them with salt) is a delicious and resourceful way to extend their life, flavor, and bioavailability of nutrients. I've used shiitake mushrooms because they're one of my favorite varieties, and because they're on the sturdier side. I also love the velvety texture that is unique to shiitake mushrooms, but this recipe can be used with any variety of mushroom you can think of. The classic pickling flavors of garlic, black peppercorn, mustard seed, coriander seed, and dill permeate the absorbant mushrooms to create a boldness of flavor that is simply divine!
Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 5 mins
Fermenting Time 4 d
Total Time 4 d 20 mins
Course Appetizer, Side Dish, Snack
Cuisine Eastern European
Servings 12

Equipment

  • glass jar (or other non-reactive container) sterilized (I use boiling water)
  • pickling weights (I use glass ones, but you could even scrub a large stone from your backyard), sterilized (again, I use boiling water)

Ingredients
  

  • 1 lb shiitake mushrooms (or other variety), stems removed (if they're tough, like shiitake stems can be)
  • kosher salt (preferably diamond crystal brand)
  • 1 head garlic, tips cut off to reveal the tops of the cloves
  • 2 Tbsp chopped dill
  • 1 Tbsp mustard seeds
  • tsp coriander seeds
  • 1 Tbsp black peppercorns, whole

Instructions
 

  • Bring a small to medium saucepan filled with salted water to a boil. Add the mushrooms and boil for 5 minutes. Remove from the water and place onto a plate lined with paper towel or a kitchen towel.
  • In a small bowl, combine the peppercorns, coriander seeds, and mustard seeds. Set aside next to a sterilized jar.
  • Add a layer of kosher salt to the bottom of the jar, along with a pinch of the spice/seed mixture. Place a layer of mushrooms over the seasonings, then add a sprinkle of salt and another pinch of the mixture. Repeat until all of the mushrooms are in the jar, topping them off with salt and the rest of the spices and seeds. Tuck the head of garlic into the jar among the mushrooms so that it's nestled nicely about halfway down.
  • Sprinkle the chopped dill over the top and place the weight (or weights, depending on how much space you have left) into the jar and seal tightly. Place in a cool, dark place (like a pantry).
  • After 24 hours, the jar should be wet inside from the salt drawing moisture out of the mushrooms. If the jar isn't filled with mushroom water, top it off with brine made by mixing 1 Tbsp kosher salt for every 1 cup of water. Reseal the jar and let it sit in a cool, dark place for another 3 days, "burping" it, or releasing air from the jar, daily.
  • Once the mushrooms have fermented, store the entire jar and its contents (including the brine) in the refrigerator. They will keep for several months.
  • Before serving, soak the mushrooms you plan on serving in fresh water for 1-3 minutes, depending on how salty you want them (the less time you soak it, the saltier the mushrooms will be). Serve cold or at room temperature as a appetizer, side, or even as a snack!
Keyword lacto-fermentation, lacto-fermented, lacto-fermented food, lacto-fermented foods, lacto-fermented mushroom, lacto-fermented mushrooms, lacto-fermented pickling, lactofermentation, Mushroom Appetizer, Mushroom Dish, Mushroom Dishes, Mushroom Recipe, Mushroom Recipes, Mushroom Side, Mushrooms Recipe, Mushrooms Recipes, Pickled, Pickled Food, Pickled Foods, Pickled Mushrooms, Shiitake, Shiitake Mushrooms, Vegan, Vegan app recipes, vegan appetizer, vegan appetizers, Vegan apps, Vegan Food, Vegan Mushroom Recipe, Vegan Mushrooms Recipe, vegan recipe, Vegan Recipes, Vegan Reipes, vegan side dish recipe, vegan side dish recipes, vegan side dishes, vegan side recipe, vegan side recipes, Vegan Sides, Vegetarian, Vegetarian Recipe, Vegetarian Recipes

Leave a Reply